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Site Information

Nationalpark Schwarzwald
Schwarzwaldhochstr.2
77889 Seebach}
07449 - 92998 0
07449 - 92998 499
info@nlp.bwl.de

Contact

Contact person "National park plan":

Do you got questions or suggestions about our National Park Plan? Please feel free to contact our responsible employees:

Susann Schäfer
National Park Planning and Participation processes
Tel.: +49 7442 18018 310
Susann.Schaefer[at]nlp.bwl.de

Regina Drobnik
National Park Planning and Participation processes
Tel.: +49 7442 18018 311
Regina.Drobnik[at]nlp.bwl.de

Dr. Britta Böhr (currently on parental leave), Head of Department,
National Park Plan
Tel.: +49 7442 18018 300
britta.boehr[at]nlp.bwl.de

Contact

Contact person "National park plan":

Do you got questions or suggestions about our National Park Plan? Please feel free to contact our responsible employees:

Susann Schäfer
National Park Planning and Participation processes
Tel.: +49 7442 18018 310
Susann.Schaefer[at]nlp.bwl.de

Regina Drobnik
National Park Planning and Participation processes
Tel.: +49 7442 18018 311
Regina.Drobnik[at]nlp.bwl.de

Dr. Britta Böhr (currently on parental leave), Head of Department,
National Park Plan
Tel.: +49 7442 18018 300
britta.boehr[at]nlp.bwl.de

Protection of the surrounding forests

Bark beetle management

If a spruce becomes infested by a large number of bark beetles the tree will die. In a commercial forest, this sees the tree being felled and sold earlier than expected with the forest owner having to accept a loss in price.

In the National Park there are no commercial goals and therefore no economic harm can be done. Hence in the core zone, trees may die and decay after an infestation of beetles. Many species live in dead and rotten wood and find here not only shelter and protection but also food. Nature doesn’t see the bark beetle as a problem. Like all other animals it belongs to the natural cycle and creates habitats for other animals and plants by clearing space in the forest. Many species are dependent upon light, open or semi-open areas in the forest, such as the capercaillie.

 

Even when large numbers of dead trees are still standing in a forest, the forest is far from being dead. Young trees grow again and a natural cycle runs its course. The National Park team must however ensure that the bark beetle does not cause any damage to the neighbouring forests. That’s why the National Park is surrounded by a 500-metre buffer zone in which freshly infested trees are removed to prevent the eggs laid in the bark from developing into the next generation of beetles. Specially trained employees regularly patrol the buffer zone so that infected trees are detected early on.

 

The National Park Plan

The National Park Plan

The operations manual for the National Park will cover all the important goals, responsibilities and topics set out in individual modules: mission statement, the management of the ...

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Process protection

Process protection

The fact that humans have specifically used and shaped nature to fulfil their own needs has caused, among other things, the loss of habitats and the extinction of many species. We ...

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Offers for guests

Offers for guests

Guests can experience pure nature in the National Park Black Forest. Making this possible is one of the main tasks of our team. The approximately 300 events - from the herbal walk ...

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Research on Nature and People

Research on Nature and People

A variety of research is undertaken in the Black Forest National Park. And the focus is not only on nature but on humans too. Protecting the natural processes is of course the ...

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Species and nature conservation

Species and nature conservation

The upland pastures of the northern Black Forest, known locally as ‘grinde’, were grazed for hundreds of years during the summer months by cattle, sheep and goats. As a result, a ...

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Responsibilities & goals

Responsibilities & goals

The responsibilities of the National Park Administration are extremely exciting and diverse. The primary objective of the National Park is summed up in the motto "leave nature to ...

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Regional development

Through its facilities and offers, the National Park also aims to stimulate positive regional development - for example, towards sustainable tourism. This also covers issues such as traffic and road planning, where experts and citizens from the surrounding cities and districts are, of course, closely involved.